Events

We offer a safe place to share thoughts, concerns, and any personal stories which are kept solely within the group. You are NOT alone.

We meet on the 2nd Tuesday of every month at 6pm

 
Beacon Mutual Insurance Co. One Beacon Centre, Warwick, RI 02886
 

Our Sons and Daughters were called to duty

(listen here)

I am a military mom, one of many elite women. I stand beside my child with courage, strength and dignity. While I am not on the battlefield or in the foxhole, I am in the heart, mind and the character of my soldier sons and daughters.

I support the Band of Mothers, who know just how I feel. Sharing encouragement, stories, laughter and tears for days or months or years.

EMAIL: ribluestarmoms@gmail.com

The Rhode Island Blue Star Moms is a military support group especially dedicated to supporting the troops and assisting the mothers and their families who have children serving in the U.S. military.

A chapter of the Blue Star Mothers of America, the RI Blue Star Moms provide military family support throughout the state of RI. Throughout the year, we create and send military care packages to show our loved ones that they are our heroes, that we appreciate their service and that we continue to support them while they are away from home.

We share our concerns, our support, our pride and our devotion for our loved ones serving in the United States Armed Forces. Through various events and activities, we support fellow Blue Star Moms, associate members, our children serving in the military, our veterans and our community. We provide military family support to benefit our members and their families and we promote causes that will benefit military personnel through a military advocacy program.

The RI Blue Star Moms is a non-partisan, non-sectarian, non-discriminatory and non-profit organization. Our mission is to support fellow Blue Star members, their sons, daughters and any other family members who are currently serving or have served in the United States military.

The Service flag is an official banner authorized by the Department of Defense for display by families who have members serving in the Armed Forces during any period of war or hostilities the United States may be engaged in for the duration of such hostilities.

EMAIL: ribluestarmoms@gmail.com

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=beacon+mutual+ins+co+warwick+ri&ll=41.731435,-71.454735&spn=0.008359,0.013797&fb=1&gl=us&hq=beacon+mutual+ins+co+warwick+ri&cid=0,0,13947880333682878883&t=h&z=16&iwloc=A

We offer a safe place to share thoughts, concerns, and any personal stories that are kept solely within the group.

I am a soldier’s mother; I sometimes march alone
And yet I stand with many, trying to be strong.
You may not recognize me as you pass me on the street;
I may look like any other that you by chance might meet.
Like any mother, in a lot of ways I still remain,
But watching my son become a soldier brought a forever change.
For deep down inside where you cannot see
My own battle rages that’s as real as it can be.
It starts with feeling pride in all he has become,
But often worry creeps in before the day is done.
Then there is his absence that never will seem right –
The days without a word that causes many sleepless nights.
And at the sight of another soldier, my heart skips a beat,
For it reminds me of my own, and that face I’d love to see.
And I have a deeper sense of the sacrifices our heroes make;
I can see the hardships on the families – the loneliness, the heartache.
But in spite of all that’s raging, this mother’s love holds strong
As I’m wrapped in God’s peace and comfort and given strength to go on.
© Cynthia Gibbs

A Mother’s Prayer

Give me the greatness of heart to see the difference between a mother’s love and duty to Country. Give me understanding that I may know, when duty calls them, they must go. Give me a task to do each day, to fill my thoughts when they’re away. And Lord, when they’re in foreign land, keep them safe in your loving hand. And Lord, when duty is in the field, please protect them and be their shield. And Lord, when deployment is so long, please give me the support to Remain strong.

Amen


May
24
Fri
BOOTS on the GROUND FOR HEROES @ FORT ADAMS STATE PARK
May 24 @ 7:00 am – May 28 @ 5:15 pm
GOLD STAR GALA @ Fort Adams in Newport
May 24 @ 6:30 pm – 11:45 pm
GOLD STAR GALA @ Fort Adams in Newport

You are invited 

TO HONOR OUR FALLEN HEROES 

at the

3rd ANNUAL

3rd Annual GOLD STAR GALA

 

with a special private viewing of the

BOOTS ON THE GROUND FOR HEROES MEMORIAL

Join us for an evening honoring post 9/11 Rhode Island’s Gold Star Families and to raise funds to support the Boots on the Ground for Heroes Memorial and the

Operation Stand Down Rhode Island’ Veterans Endowment Fund

Friday, May 24, 2019  6:30 pm

The event will begin with the laying of the RI Boots, placed by RI Gold Star Families

Reception &Dinner to follow

For tickets and more info viit OSDRI>org or facebook.com/StanddownRI

Tickets are $75.00 per person

at the Historic Fort Adams 90 Fort Adams Drive, Newport, RI

 

 

Lisa Leonti
Operation Stand Down Rhode Island
401-383-4730
lleonti@osdri.org

 

May
27
Mon
MEMORIAL DAY -MONDAY, MAY 27, 2019 @ THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
May 27 @ 12:00 am – 11:45 pm

Memorial Day

Date: Monday, May 27th, 2019.

A Federal holiday observed on the last Monday in May.

A remembrance of our veterans. 

Commemorates the men and women who died while in military service. (LISTEN HERE)

 

.

Never was so much owed by so many to so few

Winston Churchill on 20 August 1940

 

Memorial Day History

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

Local Observances Claim To Be First Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on April 29, 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

Official Birthplace Declared In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays.

Some States Have Confederate Observances Many Southern states also have their own days for honoring the Confederate dead. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April, Alabama on the fourth Monday of April, and Georgia on April 26. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10, Louisiana on June 3 and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19 and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 “with the choicest flowers of springtime” urged: “We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. … Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

The crowd attending the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery was approximately the same size as those that attend today’s observance, about 5,000 people. Then, as now, small American flags were placed on each grave — a tradition followed at many national cemeteries today. In recent years, the custom has grown in many families to decorate the graves of all departed loved ones.

The origins of special services to honor those who die in war can be found in antiquity. The Athenian leader Pericles offered a tribute to the fallen heroes of the Peloponnesian War over 24 centuries ago that could be applied today to the 1.1 million Americans who have died in the nation’s wars: “Not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions, but there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts of men.”

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”

May
18
Mon
MILITARY APPRECIATION MONTH, 2019- ARMED FORCES DAY, MAY 18, 2019
May 18 @ 12:00 am – 11:45 pm

LISTEN

The month of May is set aside as Military Appreciation Month. It’s another chance to say thank you to all of our service members, past and present. America and her liberties exist because you fought, and continue to fight for them. Thank you for your service.

Loyalty Day

Date: Wednesday, May 1st, 2019
About: Loyalty Day kicks off our Nation’s month-long celebration of military appreciation.  It is a day set aside for the reaffirmation of loyalty to the United States, and to reflect on the proud heritage of our American freedom.

Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW)

Date: Sunday, May 5th – Saturday, May 11th, 2019. Celebrated the first full week in May.
About: A time set aside to honor the men and women who serve our nation as federal, state, county and local government employees and ensure that our government is the best in the world.

Victory in Europe Day AKA V-E Day or VE Day

Date: Wednesday, May 8th, 2019
About: May 8th, 1945 is the day when Germans throughout Europe unconditionally surrendered to the Allies. This day marked the end of World War II in Europe.

Military Spouse Appreciation Day

Date: Friday, May 10th, 2019. Traditionally set for the Friday before Mother’s Day.
About: A day to honor military spouses with appropriate ceremonies and activities.  Recognizes the important role our military families play in keeping our Armed Forces strong and our country safe.

Armed Forces Day

Date: Saturday, May 18th, 2019. Celebrated the third Saturday in May every year.
About: A single holiday for citizens to come together and thank our military members for their patriotic service in support of our country.  This day honors everyone serving in the U.S. Military branches; Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marines, Navy. There is also Armed Forces Week which typically leads up to Armed Forces Day, although it is not an official observance, many activities are planned nonetheless during the week.

Memorial Day

Date: Monday, May 27th, 2019. A Federal holiday observed on the last Monday in May.
About: A remembrance of our veterans.  Commemorates the men and women who died while in military service.

History of NMAM

In 1999 Senator John McCain introduced legislation to designate the month of May as National Military Appreciation Month. Both the Senate and House of Representatives adopted resolutions calling for Americans to recognize and honor U.S. Service Members during NMAM. These proclamations also urge the President to issue a proc
The month of May is set aside as Military Appreciation Month. It’s another chance to say thank you to all of our service members, past and present. America and her liberties exist because you fought, and continue to fight for them.

Thank you for your service.

The Rhode Island Blue Star Moms is a military support group specially dedicated to supporting our Veterans, troops and assisting the mothers and families who have children who volunteered to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces.
May
27
Wed
MEMORIAL DAY -MONDAY, MAY 27, 2019 @ THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
May 27 @ 12:00 am – 11:45 pm

Memorial Day

Date: Monday, May 27th, 2019.

A Federal holiday observed on the last Monday in May.

A remembrance of our veterans. 

Commemorates the men and women who died while in military service. (LISTEN HERE)

 

.

Never was so much owed by so many to so few

Winston Churchill on 20 August 1940

 

Memorial Day History

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

Local Observances Claim To Be First Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on April 29, 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

Official Birthplace Declared In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays.

Some States Have Confederate Observances Many Southern states also have their own days for honoring the Confederate dead. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April, Alabama on the fourth Monday of April, and Georgia on April 26. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10, Louisiana on June 3 and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19 and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 “with the choicest flowers of springtime” urged: “We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. … Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

The crowd attending the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery was approximately the same size as those that attend today’s observance, about 5,000 people. Then, as now, small American flags were placed on each grave — a tradition followed at many national cemeteries today. In recent years, the custom has grown in many families to decorate the graves of all departed loved ones.

The origins of special services to honor those who die in war can be found in antiquity. The Athenian leader Pericles offered a tribute to the fallen heroes of the Peloponnesian War over 24 centuries ago that could be applied today to the 1.1 million Americans who have died in the nation’s wars: “Not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions, but there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts of men.”

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”

May
18
Tue
MILITARY APPRECIATION MONTH, 2019- ARMED FORCES DAY, MAY 18, 2019
May 18 @ 12:00 am – 11:45 pm

LISTEN

The month of May is set aside as Military Appreciation Month. It’s another chance to say thank you to all of our service members, past and present. America and her liberties exist because you fought, and continue to fight for them. Thank you for your service.

Loyalty Day

Date: Wednesday, May 1st, 2019
About: Loyalty Day kicks off our Nation’s month-long celebration of military appreciation.  It is a day set aside for the reaffirmation of loyalty to the United States, and to reflect on the proud heritage of our American freedom.

Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW)

Date: Sunday, May 5th – Saturday, May 11th, 2019. Celebrated the first full week in May.
About: A time set aside to honor the men and women who serve our nation as federal, state, county and local government employees and ensure that our government is the best in the world.

Victory in Europe Day AKA V-E Day or VE Day

Date: Wednesday, May 8th, 2019
About: May 8th, 1945 is the day when Germans throughout Europe unconditionally surrendered to the Allies. This day marked the end of World War II in Europe.

Military Spouse Appreciation Day

Date: Friday, May 10th, 2019. Traditionally set for the Friday before Mother’s Day.
About: A day to honor military spouses with appropriate ceremonies and activities.  Recognizes the important role our military families play in keeping our Armed Forces strong and our country safe.

Armed Forces Day

Date: Saturday, May 18th, 2019. Celebrated the third Saturday in May every year.
About: A single holiday for citizens to come together and thank our military members for their patriotic service in support of our country.  This day honors everyone serving in the U.S. Military branches; Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marines, Navy. There is also Armed Forces Week which typically leads up to Armed Forces Day, although it is not an official observance, many activities are planned nonetheless during the week.

Memorial Day

Date: Monday, May 27th, 2019. A Federal holiday observed on the last Monday in May.
About: A remembrance of our veterans.  Commemorates the men and women who died while in military service.

History of NMAM

In 1999 Senator John McCain introduced legislation to designate the month of May as National Military Appreciation Month. Both the Senate and House of Representatives adopted resolutions calling for Americans to recognize and honor U.S. Service Members during NMAM. These proclamations also urge the President to issue a proc
The month of May is set aside as Military Appreciation Month. It’s another chance to say thank you to all of our service members, past and present. America and her liberties exist because you fought, and continue to fight for them.

Thank you for your service.

The Rhode Island Blue Star Moms is a military support group specially dedicated to supporting our Veterans, troops and assisting the mothers and families who have children who volunteered to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces.
May
27
Thu
MEMORIAL DAY -MONDAY, MAY 27, 2019 @ THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
May 27 @ 12:00 am – 11:45 pm

Memorial Day

Date: Monday, May 27th, 2019.

A Federal holiday observed on the last Monday in May.

A remembrance of our veterans. 

Commemorates the men and women who died while in military service. (LISTEN HERE)

 

.

Never was so much owed by so many to so few

Winston Churchill on 20 August 1940

 

Memorial Day History

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

Local Observances Claim To Be First Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on April 29, 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

Official Birthplace Declared In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays.

Some States Have Confederate Observances Many Southern states also have their own days for honoring the Confederate dead. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April, Alabama on the fourth Monday of April, and Georgia on April 26. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10, Louisiana on June 3 and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19 and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 “with the choicest flowers of springtime” urged: “We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. … Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

The crowd attending the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery was approximately the same size as those that attend today’s observance, about 5,000 people. Then, as now, small American flags were placed on each grave — a tradition followed at many national cemeteries today. In recent years, the custom has grown in many families to decorate the graves of all departed loved ones.

The origins of special services to honor those who die in war can be found in antiquity. The Athenian leader Pericles offered a tribute to the fallen heroes of the Peloponnesian War over 24 centuries ago that could be applied today to the 1.1 million Americans who have died in the nation’s wars: “Not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions, but there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts of men.”

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”

May
18
Wed
MILITARY APPRECIATION MONTH, 2019- ARMED FORCES DAY, MAY 18, 2019
May 18 @ 12:00 am – 11:45 pm

LISTEN

The month of May is set aside as Military Appreciation Month. It’s another chance to say thank you to all of our service members, past and present. America and her liberties exist because you fought, and continue to fight for them. Thank you for your service.

Loyalty Day

Date: Wednesday, May 1st, 2019
About: Loyalty Day kicks off our Nation’s month-long celebration of military appreciation.  It is a day set aside for the reaffirmation of loyalty to the United States, and to reflect on the proud heritage of our American freedom.

Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW)

Date: Sunday, May 5th – Saturday, May 11th, 2019. Celebrated the first full week in May.
About: A time set aside to honor the men and women who serve our nation as federal, state, county and local government employees and ensure that our government is the best in the world.

Victory in Europe Day AKA V-E Day or VE Day

Date: Wednesday, May 8th, 2019
About: May 8th, 1945 is the day when Germans throughout Europe unconditionally surrendered to the Allies. This day marked the end of World War II in Europe.

Military Spouse Appreciation Day

Date: Friday, May 10th, 2019. Traditionally set for the Friday before Mother’s Day.
About: A day to honor military spouses with appropriate ceremonies and activities.  Recognizes the important role our military families play in keeping our Armed Forces strong and our country safe.

Armed Forces Day

Date: Saturday, May 18th, 2019. Celebrated the third Saturday in May every year.
About: A single holiday for citizens to come together and thank our military members for their patriotic service in support of our country.  This day honors everyone serving in the U.S. Military branches; Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marines, Navy. There is also Armed Forces Week which typically leads up to Armed Forces Day, although it is not an official observance, many activities are planned nonetheless during the week.

Memorial Day

Date: Monday, May 27th, 2019. A Federal holiday observed on the last Monday in May.
About: A remembrance of our veterans.  Commemorates the men and women who died while in military service.

History of NMAM

In 1999 Senator John McCain introduced legislation to designate the month of May as National Military Appreciation Month. Both the Senate and House of Representatives adopted resolutions calling for Americans to recognize and honor U.S. Service Members during NMAM. These proclamations also urge the President to issue a proc
The month of May is set aside as Military Appreciation Month. It’s another chance to say thank you to all of our service members, past and present. America and her liberties exist because you fought, and continue to fight for them.

Thank you for your service.

The Rhode Island Blue Star Moms is a military support group specially dedicated to supporting our Veterans, troops and assisting the mothers and families who have children who volunteered to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces.
May
27
Fri
MEMORIAL DAY -MONDAY, MAY 27, 2019 @ THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
May 27 @ 12:00 am – 11:45 pm

Memorial Day

Date: Monday, May 27th, 2019.

A Federal holiday observed on the last Monday in May.

A remembrance of our veterans. 

Commemorates the men and women who died while in military service. (LISTEN HERE)

 

.

Never was so much owed by so many to so few

Winston Churchill on 20 August 1940

 

Memorial Day History

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

Local Observances Claim To Be First Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on April 29, 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

Official Birthplace Declared In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays.

Some States Have Confederate Observances Many Southern states also have their own days for honoring the Confederate dead. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April, Alabama on the fourth Monday of April, and Georgia on April 26. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10, Louisiana on June 3 and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19 and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 “with the choicest flowers of springtime” urged: “We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. … Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

The crowd attending the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery was approximately the same size as those that attend today’s observance, about 5,000 people. Then, as now, small American flags were placed on each grave — a tradition followed at many national cemeteries today. In recent years, the custom has grown in many families to decorate the graves of all departed loved ones.

The origins of special services to honor those who die in war can be found in antiquity. The Athenian leader Pericles offered a tribute to the fallen heroes of the Peloponnesian War over 24 centuries ago that could be applied today to the 1.1 million Americans who have died in the nation’s wars: “Not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions, but there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts of men.”

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”